The Benefits of Prenatal Yoga

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I have been teaching Prenatal Yoga now for six years.  My first student was my baby sister and since then I have had the privilege to teach many of my dear friends as well as women in my community during one of the most important times in their lives.  The benefits of prenatal yoga are endless.  Some of the most significant findings are the reduction of depression and cortisol levels.  If  anyone you know who is expecting, the greatest gift you can give them is a gift card for prenatal yoga.  Read just some of the benefits below in my latest post for AWHONN.  Thanks for reading ❤

The Benefits of Prenatal Yoga

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4Ways to Be a More Mindful Nurse

FullSizeRender-47In this week’s post for Mighty Nurse, I offer a few simple steps to practicing mindfulness.  Mindfulness teaches us to be more conscious of our thoughts, feelings, environment, and sensations.  We have all heard the phrase, you are your own worst enemy.  Learning to tame the monkey mind by simple observations and detachment can lead to a happier, less stressed you.  All it takes is practice ❤

4 Ways to Be a More Mindful Nurse 

American Nurse Today

american-nurse-todaySo excited to share my first post with American Nurse Today, the official journal of the American Nurses Association.  With the election near, it’s hard not to have an opinion about the future of our country.  With immigration at the center of the argument, it is painful to sit back and watch as one candidate bullies his way through a campaign tainted with  hatred, bigotry, misogyny,and total disrespect for anyone that disagrees with him.  Is this the direction our country is headed?  Is this going to be the voice of the people?  What happened to “Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore?”

A Nursing Perpective on the Refugee Crisis

Signs & Symptoms of Nurse Burnout

cropped-img_4226.jpgNurse burnout is an epidemic not just in the U.S.  It happens here in Sweden as well, the world over for that matter.  It’s called “hitting the wall” in Sweden and fortunate for any individual living here, there is both financial and emotional support for those suffering.  According to a 2010 study, “the hospital nurse workforce is experiencing greater workloads resulting from shorter hospital stays, rising average patient acuity, fewer support resources, and a national nurse shortage. Higher nurse workloads are associated with burnout and job dissatisfaction, precursors to voluntary turnover that contribute to the understaffing of nurses in hospitals and poorer patient outcomes.  Indeed, more than 40% of hospital staff nurses score in the high range for job-related burnout, and more than 1 in 5 hospital staff nurses say they intend to leave their hospital jobs within 1 year.”

Burnout is a very personal story for me.  It is a story I have not shared with anyone but my closest friends and family.  Until now.  Moving to another country, learning to communicate in another language, and working in intensive care in said language threw me over the edge and became my downfall.  I then lost someone dear to me, a support I had counted on most of my life.  I felt hopeless.  I would drive to work holding on to some hope that I would make it through my shift and regain what little confidence in myself as a nurse I had left.  I left most mornings with doubt, tears, and a feeling of hopelessness.  I couldn’t sleep at night.  I would toss and turn.  On my days off I was so consumed with a lack of self confidence and worry.  Something had to give.

Why share this extremely personal story?  Because I was in denial for a long time.  Because I thought it would never happen to me.  Because it did happen to me and I want to give those experiencing burnout some sense that their is hope.  Burnout does not mean the end of your career.  It is not a reflection of you the individual.  It is a series of misfortunate circumstances.

Are you headed in that direction?  The following are a few signs and symptoms to be aware of ❤

Signs & Symptoms of Nurse Burnout

6 Ingredients for a Succesful Shift

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“It is a simple fact that working with your tribe of people can sometimes make all the difference in the world. You know that no matter what, you have one another’s backs unconditionally. No matter how difficult the day, you have a second pair of eyes, ears, and another trustworthy opinion. Somewhere, in the calmer moments, you can have a laugh.”

A shout out to the amazing nurses, nursing assistants, and docs in the NICU at Queen Silvia’s Hospital for Children in Gothenburg, Sweden.  Here is my latest for Mighty Nurse…

6 Ingredients for a Succesful Shift