A Nurse’s Vow to Her Patients

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Hello from sunny Florida ❤  Every winter, I head home for the warmth and light, embrace of family, and to remember where I come from.  Since coming home, I have been a little lax in my posting.  As a result, I will now be inundating you all with back posts 🙂

For me, being a nurse is so much more than having the skill to place an IV, the ability to detect subtle changes in a patient’s status, and the ability to deal with the multiple personalities one is confronted with on a daily basis.  It is equally important to be a good listener, strive to continually learn, and take the time to educate and advocate for one’s patients.  Our patients are not only those we treat at the bedside, but those we  are surrounded by in every day life including friends, family, and community.  A nurse is never truly off-duty.

In the last year, I have transitioned more and more away from my role as a bedside nurse to the role of maternal/infant health and education.  Patient education has always been my passion and in the last year I have been honored and privileged to offer maternal and infant education courses to expectant parents living in Gothenburg, Sweden, through a fledgling maternal/infant and wellness company.  My vow to each and every student is the same I offer my patients.  I strive to leave my own struggles behind and greet them with undisturbed enthusiasm.  I will learn from them as they learn from me and guide them with care and consideration on the journey to their baby.

The following is my vow to those I serve in my role as nurse  whether through care at the bedside or through community outreach ❤

A Nurse’s Vow to Her Patients

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6 Ingredients for a Succesful Shift

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“It is a simple fact that working with your tribe of people can sometimes make all the difference in the world. You know that no matter what, you have one another’s backs unconditionally. No matter how difficult the day, you have a second pair of eyes, ears, and another trustworthy opinion. Somewhere, in the calmer moments, you can have a laugh.”

A shout out to the amazing nurses, nursing assistants, and docs in the NICU at Queen Silvia’s Hospital for Children in Gothenburg, Sweden.  Here is my latest for Mighty Nurse…

6 Ingredients for a Succesful Shift

Observations of a Swedish Midsummer

IMG_5320Glad Midsommar!  Happy Midsummer!  It has been almost six years since I moved to Sweden!  Six years??!!  In that time I have experienced more tastes, sights, and sounds than I ever dreamed possible.

Today is one of the most celebrated holidays in Sweden, Midsummer.  It is a celebration of light, food, song, dance, family, and friends.  It also marks for many (especially those with children) the start of summer vacation.  Midsummer is the best way to start vacation.  While I normally spend Midsummer in Sweden, the past two years I have been home following my niece’s birth.  The following is Swedish Midsummer in a nutshell as seen through the eyes of this expat….

A Brief History

According to Sweden’s official site, Midsummer dates back as far as the 1500’s.   It is the Friday after the summer solstice, somewhere between June 20-26th.  It is most often celebrated outside in nature.  Every city including Stockholm and Gothenburg (Sweden’s two largest cities) becomes desolate as all inhabitants flood the countryside.

Eternal Sunshine & Nature

In some parts of Sweden, especially the far north, the sun barely sets allowing for hours of outdoor celebration and games.  We usually celebrate far north in Luleå, the city where my boyfriend is from. Tonight, the sun sets at 12:05 am and rises at 1:03 am allowing for only about 58 minutes of “darkness”.  The flowers are in full bloom and this is what makes Sweden truly one of the most beautiful countries on the planet.

 

Food

No celebration is complete without food.  Midsummer is no exception.  There are  many varieties of pickled herring to choose from.  In addition, cured or smoked salmon with boiled potatoes, dill, and sour cream are featured favorites.  Barbecuing is a must this time of year and if you are lucky and know someone who hunts moose, you may have a taste of moose filet-the greatest piece of meat on the planet.  Strawberry cake or strawberry dessert of any sort is common and my favorite part of the day!!

 

Maypole

All across Sweden, towns erect a Maypole for Midsummer festivities.  It is typically adorned with greenery and flowers and stands approximately 10 feet tall.  The origins of the Swedish maypole are thought to come from Germany.  It is said to symbolize fertility,though this is debateable among historians.

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Dance

Dancing around the Maypole is part of the day’s festivities.  The most famous dance, Små Grådarna (The Little Frogs) has participants both young and old singing and hopping like frogs in a circle around the Maypole.

Midsummer Wreath

Girls make a wreath of flowers using seven varieties of flowers.  Legend has it that after placing the flowers under your pillow at night, you will dream of the one you are meant to marry.

 

Family & Friends

Day is for family, evening for friends-at least that’s how we roll.  We usually spend the day with my boyfriend’s family on Brändön, a small island in northern Sweden.  Following a day of sunshine, song, dance, a packed picnic, and games, we make our way to our annual Midsummer party hosted by our friends, Marcus and Maria ❤  The party continues with wine, beer, barbecue, and games.

It’s funny.  Since moving overseas, I always felt like I was missing out on the birthdays, Thanksgivings, Christmases.  Now that I call Sweden home as well, I am really missing  being “home” for Midsummer!  Wishing everyone in Sweden a happy, safe Midsummer!!

Here is a great summary of the day in just a few short minutes…..

Swedish Midsummer for Dummies

Observations of a Homesick Expat or Things I Wish I’d Known Before Moving to Another Country

FullSizeRender-21I moved overseas for love.  My boyfriend was born in the far northern reaches of Sweden, as far as nearly The Arctic Circle and frequent host to the Aurora Borealis.  When I approached the idea of moving there, it felt like such an adventure-the adventure of a lifetime.  I was moving to one of the world’s most progressive, innovative, and environmentally aware countries on the planet.

I’ve always embraced new endeavors with intense determination and childlike excitement.  It’s just who I am.  Moving to another country has tested the limits of these qualities and while I’m still standing, still determined, it has been no walk in the park.  It tests who you are at the very core.  I’ve read endless articles on life as an expat, have bonded for life with expats and natives alike, and found there is a common path one winds down in the process of integration.

There Truly is a Honeymoon Period

Every possible thing about your new country is perfect.  It’s like a scene from Travel Channel and you’re the host.
You’re enthusiastic about learning the language, trying the foods, embracing the customs.

You Wonder Why They Can’t Just Do Things Like They Do Back Home??

As weeks turn into months and you try to settle in to your new life, frustration ensues.  You have to take a number and get in line for everything, even at the doctor’s office.  The only number you take at home is in line at the deli at Publix.  You don’t understand why any decision in Sweden requires a group meeting of intense discussion and counter discussion even if it’s something as simple as what to eat.

Longing for Familiar Makes You Eat and Do the Strangest Things

You find yourself standing in line and paying the equivalent of $20 for a measly pancake breakfast at one of the only breakfast places in town.  Said pancakes are delicious and worth every penny as they temporarily fill the void in longing for home. The ethnic section in the grocery store now applies to you.  You consider buying that jar of marshmallow creme (that you haven’t eaten since you were seven) in the American section.

You Become an Ambassador for Your Country

You now (reluctantly) represent your country everywhere you go.  You are known as “the American” and with it comes all the clichés and assumptions.  You hope to leave a positive image of Americans and disprove the cliché that we are all loud, lazy, know it alls.

No One Else Cares That it’s Thanksgiving

That special, warm feeling you get when you wake up on Thanksgiving in anticipation of your mom’s delicious stuffing and the annual Macy’s Day Parade?  You’re the only one that feels it.  It’s just another Thursday in Sweden.

You Become a Smuggler

You start filling your suitcase with your favorite shampoo, skin care line, even canned pumpkin and turkey bags while home because it either costs twice as much in Sweden or you think you won’t find it there at all.  Your closet starts to look like a mini super market.

You eventually Find the Replacements

Your first year you talk your mother into shipping two cans of Ocean Spray cranberry sauce bearing in mind that it has now cost her at least ten times the amount in shipping.  Must have the cranberry sauce!  Your second year you opt for lingonberry jam and are pleasantly surprised that it is actually as good if not better.

You Begin to Feel at Home

You start understanding and speaking the language more and more.  You find your tribe of people and they become your parallel family.  You begin to add Swedish traditions and customs into your own life.

You Wonder Why Can’t They Do Things That Way Back Home???

After about a year you start criticizing your own country.  You find chaos when waiting in line and wonder why they don’t have a number system.  You notice everyone is in a hurry, stressed and all you want to do is fika.  You are the one who now initiates intense group discussions before making any decision.

You Smuggle the Other Way

You start bringing home coffee, bread, cookies, and other Swedish staples.  Family and friends  demand said items on every future return.

You Learn to Embrace the Best of Both Worlds

You grow with leaps and bounds, often unknowingly and reluctantly.  You learn that people are the same wherever you go.  You learn to embrace new traditions, foods, ways of thinking and add them to who you are.  You crave cured salmon, sandwich cake, and long Sunday drives in the beautiful Swedish country side.  Your expat friends anticipate your annual Thanksgiving dinners.

You still long for home every day in your heart

You go home to remember who you are, where you come from.  You long for a taco salad at Taco Shack, Trader Joe’s peanut butter pretzels, and Sunday night Walking Dead marathons with your sisters.  While you love your adopted country and all that living there has taught you, you know deep down in your heart there’s no place like home.